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authorPeter Stephenson <[email protected]>2010-03-19 21:11:15 +0000
committerPeter Stephenson <[email protected]>2010-03-19 21:11:15 +0000
commit7dd4c69371b1b8a3bdb7e89a14f1750559b8cc42 (patch)
treef6dd61d2c7dc2740b905b6d2c6b9e55b04fe2098 /Etc
parent5e629a45659e512fae2f3a7f411f12f82defeeb5 (diff)
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FAQ update
Diffstat (limited to 'Etc')
-rw-r--r--Etc/FAQ.yo42
1 files changed, 30 insertions, 12 deletions
diff --git a/Etc/FAQ.yo b/Etc/FAQ.yo
index 3ebae61e..808b88ca 100644
--- a/Etc/FAQ.yo
+++ b/Etc/FAQ.yo
@@ -588,10 +588,11 @@ tt(EXTENDED_GLOB).
occurred somewhere in the path (e.g. mytt(users/barstaff/foo) will
be excluded by the mytt(~) operator). As the mytt(**) operator cannot
be grouped (inside parentheses it is treated as mytt(*)), this is
- the way to exclude some subdirectories from matching a mytt(**).
+ one way to exclude some subdirectories from matching a mytt(**).
+ The form (^foo/)# also works.
it() Unquoted assignments do file expansion after mytt(:)s (intended for
PATHs).
- it() mytt(typeset) and mytt(integer) have special behaviour for
+ it()* mytt(typeset) and mytt(integer) have special behaviour for
assignments in ksh, but not in zsh. For example, this doesn't
work in zsh:
verb(
@@ -605,7 +606,7 @@ tt(EXTENDED_GLOB).
itemize(
it()* There is no tt($ENV) variable (use tt(/etc/zshrc), tt(~/.zshrc);
note also tt($ZDOTDIR)).
- it() tt($PATH) is not searched for commands specified
+ it()* tt($PATH) is not searched for commands specified
at invocation without -c.
)
it() Aliases and functions:
@@ -1738,14 +1739,31 @@ sect(What's wrong with cut and paste on my xterm?)
sect(How do I get coloured prompts on my colour xterm?)
- (Or `color xterm', if you're reading this in black and white.) You need
- to find the sequences which generate the various colours from the manual
- for your terminal emulator; these are ANSI standard on those I know about
- which support colour. With a recent (post 3.1.6) distribution of zsh,
- there is a theme system to handle this for you; even if you don't see that,
- the installed function `mytt(colors)' (meaning `colours', if you're not
- reading this in black and white) gives the escape sequences. You will end
- up with code looking like this (borrowed from Oliver Kiddle):
+ (Or `color xterm', if you're reading this in black and white.)
+
+ Versions of the shell starting with the 4.3 series have this
+ built in. Use
+ verb(
+ PS1='%K{white}%F{red}<red on white>%f%k<default colours>'
+ )
+ to change the prompt. Names are only usable for the colours
+ black, red, green, yellow, blue, magenta, cyan and white, understood
+ by most terminals, but if you happen to know the details of how
+ your terminal implements colours you can specify a number, e.g.
+ mytt(%20F) to turn the foreground into colour number 20. mytt(echotc
+ Co) will often output the number of colours the terminal supports.
+ (Careful: mytt(echotc co) is different; it also outputs a number
+ but it's the number of columns in the terminal.) If this is 8
+ then probably you have the named colours and nothing more.
+
+ In older versions of the shell you need to find the sequences which
+ generate the various colours from the manual for your terminal
+ emulator; these are ANSI standard on those I know about which support
+ colour. With a recent (post 3.1.6) distribution of zsh, there is a
+ theme system to handle this for you; even if you don't see that, the
+ installed function `mytt(colors)' (meaning `colours', if you're not
+ reading this in black and white) gives the escape sequences. You will
+ end up with code looking like this (borrowed from Oliver Kiddle):
verb(
PS1=$'%{\e[1;31m%}<the rest of your prompt here>%{\e[0m%}'
)
@@ -2002,7 +2020,7 @@ sect(What is multibyte input?)
just needs to ask the system library how many octets form the next
character, and if there's a valid character there at all. (It can also
ask the system what width the character takes up on the screen, so that
- characters no longer need to be exacxtly one position wide.)
+ characters no longer need to be exactly one position wide.)
The way this is done is called UTF-8. Multibyte encodings of other
character sets exist (you might encounter them for Asian character sets);